With a career that spans nearly 40 years, and music that continues to inspire and influence new generations of artists and fans alike, Rush has become one of the most beloved bands of all time. This past April in Los Angeles, the band took its rightful place alongside other music heavyweights when they were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.


On October 1, two major reissues from Rush will be available via Atlantic/Rhino. The first is a seven-disc boxed set, The Studio Albums 1989-2007, which includes every studio album Rush recorded for Atlantic Records: 1989's Presto, 1991's Roll the Bones, 1993's Counterparts, 1996's Test for Echo, 2002's Vapor Trails, 2004's Feedback covers EP, and 2007's Snakes & Arrows. Each album will be presented in a wallet sleeve that faithfully reproduces the original artwork—except for Vapor Trails, which features a re-interpreted version of the original cover, for reasons that will become clear below. The box will be available for a list price of $49.98.


The Studio Albums 1989-2007 will include a remixed version of Vapor Trails. In 2009, two tracks from the album—"One Little Victory" and "Earthshine"—were remixed for the Retrospective III collection, but now the entire album has been remixed, and will be available separately, as well as in the boxed set. The stand-alone version will be $11.98 on CD, $29.98 on double LP, and $9.99 for digital download, and will also be released October 1.


"Vapor Trails was an album made under difficult and emotional circumstances—sort of like Rush learning how to be Rush again—and as a result, mistakes were made that we have longed to correct. David Bottrill's remixes have finally brought some justice and clarity to this deserving body of our work,” says Geddy Lee.


"Every song has been given a new life, from the fire of 'One Little Victory,' 'Secret Touch,' and 'Ceiling Unlimited' to the melodic musicality of 'Sweet Miracle' and 'How It Is'… these songs have been redeemed. Thank you David!"


Up above, you can watch the video for "Stick It Out," from Counterparts, because that album rules.