Two of Slipknot's infamous masks have been featured in Western Illinois University Art Professor Bruce Walters' Vultus project.  While the term 'Vultus' means "face" or "faces," the project consists of a perpetual video loop shot in high contrast black and white showcasing straight-ahead photographs of 100 different masks morphing into one another. It was projected on the Figge Art Museum in Davenport, Iowa on Halloween accompanied by Ray Malone on drums and coincided with the Davenport Halloween Parade and the Zombie Pride Parade. See the footage below!

While many of the masks used are specific to Halloween, a number of African, Asian and Native American cultural masks and sculptures of faces in addition to the Slipknot masks.

The masks have "a psychological aspect, which I think is intriguing," Walters told The Des Moines Register. "Even when I was photographing them, all of a sudden it felt like you were in the room with a stranger. There's something very threatening, very aggressive, especially with the blank white faces, like the hockey mask. I found that to be the most frightening. You can't read their intentions. You don't know what they're thinking."

As for his inclusion of Slipknot in the project, Walters explains, "I don't know their music especially well, but I looked on YouTube and my first thought was that these guys are great. It was so brutal, so over-the-top. I thought, 'These guys really know theater.'"